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Posts Tagged ‘Freshwater’

My good buddy (and Somethin’s Fishy Regular) Jeff  White sent me some AWESOME bug pics from my home waters in NE Pennsyltucky – the Delaware. Very cool insect shots, make me miss home!

A genus Stenonema male spinner - hard to identify EXACT species - notice the clear abdomen. So cool! Photo by: Jeff White

A female Steno spinner of (possibly) the same species as the previous pic. White abdomen instead of clear. Photo by: Jeff White

My favorite Mayfly - the Isonychia Bicolor (Slate Drake or Trout Crack), with a steno spinner above it on the leaf. They'll ALWAYS eat an Iso! Photo by: Jeff White

An Isonychia dun that didn't quite make it. Photo by: Jeff White

A Isonychia female dun in the missionary position. Little does she know that she'll be on top later. Photo by: Jeff White

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Now that the warmer weather is here, it seems everybody is getting out and chasing fish in our local ponds and lakes –  here are a few pictures to celebrate some of our warm water friends…….

G-Man (Gunnison Hays) with his FIRST bass on the fly!! Photo by: Joel Hays (aka Proud Papa)

......not to be outdone, Dad whacks a big one. Photo by: G-Man Hays

Ron Foster holds a BIG bream - check out the purple! Photo by: David Leake

Another bream witha HUGE tail - crazy fun on a 3-wt! Photo by: David Leake

Ron Foster and I with one of our many doubles for the day. Photo by: David Leake

One of the more colorful guys I caught. Photo by: David Leake

One of the more colorful guys I caught. Photo by: David Leake

Brent Boone cooking up some "Cowboy Chow" on the dock - notice the kick-ass Tula he's rocking! Photo by: David Leake

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Shop regular (and our favorite curmudgeon) Bill Seals had a fantastic day out on the Brazos river yesterday, catching a multitude bass, culminating in a monster Smallmouth Buffalo. These guys are basically freshwater Permit, and hooking one is enough of a challenge, let alone landing one of this caliber. Great job Bill!

Bill Seals holds a huge Brazos Buffalo.

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One of my best friends and fishing buddies Jeff (el Jefe) White has developed (amongst all his other crazy, softtex-high-induced patterns) a crawfish streamer that is like no other. Dubbed the “Messy Craw,” it looks like a whole lot of nothing until it hits the water, and then it becomes a bass/trout/carp/anything slaying machine. Featured in Flick Ford‘s Book Fish, this bass assassin is totally alive, and definitely a killer pattern.  Jeff currently resides in the hills (i.e. sticks) of East Tennessee, fishing every tailwater within 100 miles, and begrudgingly raising chickens. If you wish to thank him for this contribution, gifts of live Warren Zevon show recordings and decent (or cheap, he doesn’t discriminate) beer are always appreciated. Here’s a step-by-step guide to tying this bad boy.

The Messy Craw. Photo by: Jeff White

Messycraw (Orange Phase)

Materials:

Hook: Daiichi  2461 #2 Black Aberdeen or Equivalent

Thread: Uni Orange 3/0

Eyes: Medium Lead Dumbell

Rubber legs: Orange and Pumpkinseed

Marabou:  Orange and Olive/Brown

Body: Brown Chenille or Brown Aunt Lydia’s rug yarn

Flash: Flat Thin Gold Flashabou

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Step 1: tie in medium lead eyes one eye length behind hook eye

Step 1. Photo by: Jeff White

Step 1. Photo by Jeff White

Step 2.  Tie in 1 orange rubber leg and one pumpkin seed rubber leg at the bend of the hook. Fold over and cover with thread.

Step 2. Photo by: Jeff White

Step 3. Tie in one orange and one olive/brown marabou plume and palmer together at the bend of the hook.

Step 3. Photo by: Jeff White

Step 3.1. Photo by: Jeff White

Step 4. Cross Wrap orange and pumpkin seed rubber legs one-third back from the hook eye and ½ back from the hook eye.

Step 4. Photo by: Jeff White

Step 5. Tie in brown Aunt Lydias rug yarn at the hook bend and wrap forward to hook eye.

Step 5. Photo by: Jeff White

Step 6. Tie in 1 orange and one olive/brown marabou plume in front of the lead eyes and palmer around the hook.

Step 6. Photo by: Jeff White

Step 7. Tie in 5 strands of gold flashabou at the hook eye extending to the marabou tail.  Tie off and secure with cement.

Step 7. Photo by: Jeff White

Tying this pattern in a “blue phase” has also been pretty damn effective. Here is the recipe, the steps are identical:

Materials:

Hook: Daiichi  2461 #2 Black Aberdeen

Thread: Uni Olive 3/0

Eyes: Medium Lead Dumbell

Rubber legs: Blue/Silver Flake and Pumpkinseed

Marabou: Blue/dun and olive/brown

Body: Olive Chenille

Flash: Flat Blue Flashabou

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After the supreme disappoinment of no Broken Bow fishing until December, we were elated to receive word from Rob Woodruff that the Lower Mountain Fork in Oklahoma is back in business! The Army Corps of Engineers has decided to only work on a single turbine at a time, which will allow Spillway Creek and the Zone 1 to be fishable during the repairs. In addition, the stocking schedule for the river is back on track.

Zones 2 and 3 will still be ‘sketchy’ as far as the fishing is concerned, with the water being much higher than usual for the time of year, but there is still plenty of fishable water to be had! When the lake drops below 599 ft, generation will go back to a more usable schedule, allowing better access to the water on Zones 2 and 3.

Come see us at the shop for the most recent report and to grab your flies before you head up!

 

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Brent, Matt and I went out to the Brazos River below Possum Kingdom Dam on the 11th, and while we didn’t whack a ton of stripers as we had intended, we certainly had a good time walking through eye-high brush and watching carp fly by us in the shallower parts of the river. We couldn’t get shots off at them fast enough, unfortunately. Matt did bring both SLRs with him – one in an underwater housing, the other on the tripod. While we didn’t get to shoot any fish porn, we still had the opportunity to play a bit – see below for a few shots from the trip (ok, more than a few).

It was the first time there for any of us, and we definitely liked what we saw. Initially, my inner bug-geek went bonkers. We stepped down into a side channel, and within seconds a Baetis dun came floating by me. Not only that, but TONS of tiny Trico spinners were bouncing around above the surface, just like you’d see on the Missouri. Crazy for this time of year, but absolutely AWESOME for me to see. I’ll stop now before I get more carried away…..

The cooler weather that had rolled in over the last few days had likely knocked the fish down a bit, but Matt caught what initially looked like a Smallmouth, but was more likely a Spotted Bass, and I caught another guy not too dissimilar down stream. Definitely a new species for me, and that is always cool!

We moved downstream to where Rt. 16 crosses the Brazos as a wonderful stone arch bridge – georgeous architecture. We were able to peer down into the water below, and saw a 30+ pound carp swimming around, with 3 bass pushing 2-lb each in tow. Matt scooted down to the bank to take a shot, but he got a bit deep, and we lost our opportunity. Still, the spotting and watching was a blast….if Matt could only get his act together….. j/k

The highlight of the trip, without a doubt was our ‘streamside’ brunch while we listened to the Cowboys game on the old AM radio. A mantra I lived and died by while guiding was this, “You can’t control the fishing, but you sure can control what you’re eating!” It definitely paid off in spades as Matt (fresh off his cooking/guiding exploits in AK) and Brent put together a little burrito feast of scrambled eggs, breakfast sausage and brats. Solid win for the team, and I trip I will definitely repeat in the near future!

This was just one of the boxes we brought. We like flies. Photo by: Matt Jones

This was just one of the boxes we brought. We like flies. Photo by: Matt Jones

Brent and I walking in. No backpack, so the Fishpond Dakota had to suffice. Loaded for bear. Photo by: Matt Jones

Brent and I walking in. No backpack, so the Fishpond Dakota had to suffice. Loaded for bear. You can never have too many rods with you. Photo by: Matt Jones

Eye-high. Brent and I aren't kneeling. And we aren't that short. Photo by: Matt Jones

Eye-high. Brent and I aren't kneeling, and we aren't that short. We saw a slew of carp cruising by and one BIG bass that ignored us and Matt. Photo by: Matt Jones

Can you say "tip flex?" Photo by: Matt Jones

Can you say "tip flex?" Photo by: Matt Jones

Matt Jones fishing with Tricos threatening to carry him off. Photo by: Bart Larmouth

Matt Jones fishing with Tricos threatening to carry him off. Photo by: Bart Larmouth

Looking in the water. Also - I'm not THAT fat - I have 4 fly boxes stuffed in the pockets of my Cloudveil. I think Matt planned this angle. Skinny bas%&$d. Photo by: Matt Jones

Looking in the water. Also - I'm not THAT fat - I have 4 fly boxes stuffed in the pockets of my Cloudveil. I think Matt planned this angle. Skinny bas%&$d. Photo by: Matt Jones

Signs of life on the Brazos. Photo by: Matt Jones

Signs of life on the Brazos. Photo by: Matt Jones

Matt putting his experience to good use. Photo by: Bart Larmouth

Matt putting his experience to good use. Photo by: Bart Larmouth

The amazing creation sprung from Brent's imagination. Photo by: Matt Jones

The amazing creation sprung from Brent's imagination. Photo by: Matt Jones

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Friend of the shop and carp-guru Joel Hays had a nice review of the new TFO Clouser rod series on his blog this week – click HERE to check it out!

The New TFO Clouser Series on Display at Tailwaters. Photo by: Shannon Drawe

The New TFO Clouser Series on Display at Tailwaters. Photo by: Shannon Drawe

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